CHIRP Book Club

Join CHIRP at our store on Thursday, October 3rd, for the next installment of their bi-monthly book group, covering Please Kill Me: The Uncensored History of Punk by Legs McNeil and Gillian McCain

 

FAQ:
 
Q: Do I have to finish the whole book?
 
A: No! Really, you just need to have an opinion or interest in the topic of the book. You will not be tested on comprehension or interpretation of themes, motifs, etc.
 
Q: What do you guys talk about?
 
A: Usually we'll have someone facilitate the discussion by asking some general questions (did you like/dislike? favorite/least favorite part, etc.) and identifying some interesting passages or questions raised by the book. We also listen to music related to the topic at hand.
 
Q: Is it a big group?
 
A: Nope, typically just 4-8 people, which is probably for the best. We want to have a good discussion where everybody feels comfortable to speak. 
 
Q: How late do you go?
 
A: The shop closes at 8pm and we try to get out shortly after. Participants are encouraged to continue their discussions over drinks at one of Roscoe's many fine establishments. 
 
Each meeting is BYOB and light refreshments are provided. If you are interested in leading the discussion for any of the books listed above or making a playlist, please email moizza@chirpradio.org.
 
Books we've covered so far:
Our Band Could Be Your Life: Scenes from the American Indie Underground 1981-1991 by Michael Azzerad
Yeah! Yeah! Yeah: The Story of Modern Pop by Bob Stanley
Celine Dion's Let's Talk About Love: A Journey to the End of Taste (33 1/3)
Retromania: Pop Culture's Addiction to Its Own Past by Simon Reynolds
The Rest is Noise: Listening to the 20th Century by Alex Ross
Girls to the Front: The True Story of the Riot Grrrl Revolution by Sara Marcus
Can't Stop Won't Stop: A History of the Hip Hop Generation by Jeff Chang
The First Collection of Criticism by a Living Female Rock Critic by Jessica Hopper
Rip It Up and Start Again: Postpunk 1978-1984 by Simon Reynolds
How Music Works by David Byrne
Hunger Makes Me a Modern Girl by Carrie Brownstein
They Can't Kill Us Until They Kill Us by Hanif Abdurraqib
Our Noise: The Story of Merge Records by Laura Ballance
 
Event date: 
Thursday, October 3, 2019 - 7:00pm
Lipstick Traces: A Secret History of the Twentieth Century Cover Image
$32.50
ISBN: 9780674034808
Availability: On Our Shelves Now
Published: Belknap Press - November 2009

Greil Marcus, author of Mystery Train, widely acclaimed as the best book ever written about America as seen through its music, began work on this new book out of a fascination with the Sex Pistols: that scandalous antimusical group, invented in London in 1975 and dead within two years, which sparked the emergence of the culture called punk. "I am an antichrist " shouted singer Johnny Rotten--where in the world of pop music did that come from? Looking for an answer, with a high sense of the drama of the journey, Marcus takes us down the dark paths of counterhistory, a route of blasphemy, adventure, and surprise. This is no mere search for cultural antecedents. Instead, what Marcus so brilliantly shows is that various kinds of angry, absolute demands--demands on society, art, and all the governing structures of everyday life--seem to be coded in phrases, images, and actions passed on invisibly, but inevitably, by people quite unaware of each other. Marcus lets us hear strange yet familiar voices: of such heretics as the Brethren of the Free Spirit in medieval Europe and the Ranters in seventeenth-century England; the dadaists in Zurich in 1916 and Berlin in 1918, wearing death masks, chanting glossolalia; one Michel Mourre, who in 1950 took over Easter Mass at Notre-Dame to proclaim the death of God; the Lettrist International and the Situationist International, small groups of Paris--based artists and writers surrounding Guy Debord, who produced blank-screen films, prophetic graffiti, and perhaps the most provocative social criticism of the 1950s and '60s; the rioting students and workers of May '68, scrawling cryptic slogans on city walls and bringing France to a halt; the Sex Pistols in London, recording the savage "Anarchy in the U.K." and "God Save the Queen." Although the Sex Pistols shape the beginning and the end of the story, Lipstick Traces is not a book about music; it is about a common voice, discovered and transmitted in many forms. Working from scores of previously unexamined and untranslated essays, manifestos, and filmscripts, from old photographs, dada sound poetry, punk songs, collages, and classic texts from Marx to Henri Lefebvre, Marcus takes us deep behind the acknowledged events of our era, into a hidden tradition of moments that would seem imaginary except for the fact that they are real: a tradition of shared utopias, solitary refusals, impossible demands, and unexplained disappearances. Written with grace and force, humor and an insistent sense of tragedy and danger, Lipstick Traces tells a story as disruptive and compelling as the century itself.